Author Archives: Lynnwood Japanese Restaurant

Vegetarian Sushi

Are you a vegetarian, vegan, or simply a person trying to get less meat and seafood in your diet? If so, there’s no reason that you can’t still enjoy a meal of quality Japanese cuisine. There’s even a rich array of meatless sushi available, so that our vegetarian friends need not be left out in the cold at Wild Wasabi.

Though it is generally expected that sushi will feature fish, egg, or a similar protein, this is not necessarily the case. It is the sushi rice that makes a dish sushi, and not the ingredients that supplement this rice. For this reason, you can often expect to find sushi dishes that are free of meat, like kappamaki, cucumber rolls, inari, or seaweed rolls. At Wild Wasabi, we offer a number of special vegetable-based rolls, including our veggie tempura roll, our veggie medusa, the spicy V8 roll, and more. Round out your dining experience with some of our vegetable-based appetizers, like our classic edamame, agedashi tofu, or vegetable tempura.

If you have any other dietary restrictions, consult your server at our Japanese restaurant in Lynnwood to learn more about our dishes.

Is Miso Bad for a Low-Sodium Diet?

There are many benefits to a good bowl of miso soup. Indeed, Japan’s heavy consumption of this classic dish may account for much of the country’s good health. The one big concern that some people have when it comes to miso soup is the high sodium content; with the average teaspoon of miso featuring between 200 and 300 milligrams of this blood-pressure-raising element, it can easily scare away those struggling with high sodium levels.

The good news is that, according to recent studies, miso’s high sodium content may not be as bad as it seems. A research team fed miso to one group of lab animals, giving a second group a comparable amount of salt. They found that the animals who got their sodium from the miso did not experience an increased blood pressure. After repeating the test on humans, similar results were found. The reasons behind this are not well understood.

So, when you come to our Japanese restaurant in Lynnwood, don’t be afraid of trying one of our delicious miso soup options. We have both the classic miso and asaro miso, served with manila clam.

What Sushi Do the Japanese Prefer?

Nobody knows sushi like the Japanese. So, when you’re looking for a truly authentic and high-quality sushi meal, it’s not a bad idea to take a look at what the most popular sushi dishes in Japan are. A while back, Asahi took a survey of eight hundred thirty Japanese citizens, asking them what their sushi favorites were. The results were as follows:

The number one sushi choice for the Japanese turned out to be chutoro, a medium-fatty variety of tuna. This selection claimed 15.3% of the vote. Sake, or salmon, came in at second place, with 9% of participants identifying it as their favorite. Maguro akami, or red tuna, claimed a close third place with 8.8% of the vote. These were followed by the likes of squid, sea urchin, salmon roe, and yellowtail.

When you want to sample the sushi that most appeals to the Japanese, come to Wild Wasabi. You can find many of these classic favorites, and a whole lot more, at our Japanese restaurant in Lynnwood.

The History of Japan’s Famous Seafood Market

If you know anything about Japanese food or the seafood industry, you should know about Japan’s Tsukiji Market. Located on the shore of Tokyo, this important landmark is one of the world’s most important markets. It boasts the title of the single largest wholesale food market in the world. So much fish comes and goes through this venue, it’s hard to eat at a restaurant in Japan without consuming something that was purchased here.

The history of Tsukiji goes all the way back to 1657. It was during this year that the area underwent the Great Fire of Meireki. Much of the city of Edo, which was the capital of Japan at the time, was consumed by this fire, which killed about 100,000 people and forced many others out of their homes. The Tokugawa shogunate labored to rebuild their capital and find a new place for the people to live; to this end, they reclaimed land from the sea and called it “constructed land”, or Tsukiji. Here, the displaced people were able to live off of the ocean’s bounty and build new lives for themselves.

Over time, Tsukiji became an important nexus of commerce. It was the place where foreigners would first enter Japan for the first time. Today, it remains a thriving seafood hub, where bluefin tuna routinely shatter price records in auction.

Is Tofu Bad for Women?

Some people will tell you that women should stay away from tofu, particularly if they are either at particular risk of developing breast cancer or are currently struggling with breast cancer. The argument being made in favor of this is that the isoflavones found in tofu have an effect that is similar to estrogen, which might encourage the growth of malignant cells in the breast. Fortunately, it would seem that these fears are without merit.

According to recent research coming out of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a diet rich in tofu and similar soy-based dishes can actually decrease your risk factor of dying from breast cancer by a significant degree. Women who eat tofu after overcoming breast cancer also showed a lower chance of relapsing. So long as you stick to whole soy foods, like tofu and soymilk, it’s hard to go wrong.

If you’re looking for delicious ways to make soy a bigger part of your diet, come to Wild Wasabi in Lynnwood. We offer a number of soy-based favorites, including our edamame, our agedashi tofu, our tofu salad, and more!

Tips for a Low-Sodium Sushi Meal

It can be hard to eat out on a low-sodium diet, since most restaurant food is fairly heavy in salt. If you’re trying to reduce your sodium levels, the good news is that sushi is one of your better restaurant options. Just keep the following tips in mind, and it should be easy to abide by your diet at Wild Wasabi in Lynnwood:

  • Without any sauces added to it, most sushi is very low in sodium. There is a tiny amount of salt added to the rice, which amounts to roughly 200 milligrams for the average full sushi meal.
  • Look out for sauces! This includes not only sodium-rich soy sauce, but also many of the mayos and sauces used in a lot of fusion rolls.
  • Avoid unagi and tamago.
  • Potassium is good for helping purge sodium from your body. Look for potassium-rich foods.
  • Fortunately, most seafood is rich in this valuable mineral; in particular, look for halibut, tuna, and salmon.

Please talk to your server if you have any other dietary concerns.

Coming of Age Day in Japan

The second Monday of every January in Japan is a very important day. This is a national holiday that the Japanese call Coming of Age Day, a day where the Japanese youth who have reached twenty years old are officially recognized as adults. This is the age where they can legally vote, drink, and smoke for the first time, as well as the age where they are expected to start becoming self-reliant and productive members of society.

On this day, municipal governments throughout Japan hold special coming-of-age ceremonies for their twenty-year-olds. The men will generally dress up in suits, while the women will often wear the traditional furisode kimono. Afterwards, groups of youths will often go out to share a drink together in celebration.

Should you need a proper way to celebrate the special occasions in your life, come and visit us at Wild Wasabi. Our Lynnwood Japanese restaurant has a wide assortment of classic dishes to make any day more special.

Have a Good Year of the Monkey!

February 8th of 2016 is Lunar New Year, when people throughout the world will be ushering in the Year of the Monkey. Lucky numbers associated with this year are 4 and 9, while unlucky numbers are 2 and 7. The lucky colors are white, blue, and gold, while the unlucky colors are red and pink.

Since a given year is traditionally considered unlucky for people born under the same zodiac sign, this year may be bad for people born in the Year of the Monkey. However, 2016 promises to bring great, unexpected fortune. This is a time when Monkeys should make investments, but avoid gambling or taking financial risks. In terms of relationships, Monkeys are likely to have difficulty this year; the harder you try for a relationship, the less likely you are to maintain one for long. Overall, it’s a good idea to be safe, seize your opportunities when they present themselves to you, and make preparations for the future.

No matter what your sign may be, any year can be a good year if you make quality sushi a bigger part of your diet. Come to Wild Wasabi’s Lynnwood Japanese restaurant to get your Year of the Monkey off to a good start.

Why You Shouldn’t Worry About Salmonella

Last year, numerous cases of salmonella caused people to become concerned about the safety of their sushi. Eleven people had to be hospitalized after eating sushi made from a certain infected batch of tuna. How does something like this happen in this day and age, and how can you be sure to avoid this unfortunate and potentially fatal disease during your own sushi outings?

The first thing to realize is that the sushi linked to each of these salmonella cases came from workplace cafeterias and grocery stores. It is in places like that that you can often expect sushi to sit out in the open for long periods of time, rather than being made fresh to order. This makes it a bit more likely that an unsafe piece will slip past the best sanitation practices.

At our Lynnwood Japanese restaurant, you’re not only getting superior health standards than your average grocery store, but you’re also getting the kind of fresh taste and high quality that can only be achieved with a restaurant-grade itamae. Come to Wild Wasabi for safe and delicious sushi today!

Christmas Gift Traditions in Japan

Japan is no stranger to Christmas. Only about two percent of the population practices Christianity, so the religious significance of the day is not on the forefront, but the general public still embraces it as a fun and festive day for coming together with a spirit of joy and giving.

Giving gifts is an important part of Japanese Christmas traditions. They share the Santa Claus story with their kids, who will receive presents from the jolly old elf in the same way that American children do. Among couples, the gift that a boyfriend gives to a girlfriend is often seen as a significant indicator of their relationship. Young couples will commonly go out for a walk to look at the public Christmas decoration displays, share a romantic meal at a restaurant, and exchange their gifts on Christmas Eve.

Make the season a little more bright this year by giving the gift of sushi and other Japanese favorites. Bring the special someone on your shopping list down to Wild Wasabi in Lynnwood!